100 Years Ago, Sept. 1, 1920


Rev. Hughes of Dwyer was thrown from his wagon when his team had a runaway and his neck was broken. An operation is planned at the Wheatland Hospital in hopes of saving his life.

The Burlington and C&S are sponsoring a “Better Farming” traveling exhibit which will be around the county during the next week. Models of different types of farms, farming equipment, farming methods, and seeds, feeds, and trees will be displayed, along with exhibits of the latest home conveniences. The traveling exhibit will stop in Glendo, Guernsey, Torrington, and Lingle and remain for several hours so all interested parties can enjoy the displays.

An organized gang of four Mexican shoplifters made their way through the businesses of Guernsey plying their trade. Robberies were reported at Thompson Drug, Guernsey Hardware, and Guernsey Mercantile. Deputy Sheriff Wright and posse caught the thieves within 12 hours and they were taken to the Wheatland jail.

Guernsey’s high school was greatly damaged after being hit with lightning during the fiercest electrical storm to ever hit the area. Plaster was torn from the walls, over 60 window panes were broken, and some furniture was damaged. Repairs are expected to cost more than $2500. While unfortunate in a way, citizens are mighty thankful that school was not yet in session.

Distinguished and influential Holly Sugar Company officials will spend some time in and around Torrington, Guernsey, and the surrounding countryside as they make their plans for the sugar beet factory soon to be built in Torrington.

A.S. Roach, former Platte County Sheriff and now State Prohibition Commissioner, led federal prohibition officers in an investigation into alleged bootlegging operations in the western part of the state. As the agents were hidden close to the suspected ranch, a bunch of hogs came staggering down the road acting totally intoxicated which convinced the officers even more of the illegal activities going on at the ranch near Kemmerer. When the raid was carried out it was discovered that the feeding troughs for the hogs contained the remnants of a yeast and prune mash. Several score of bottles of bonded whiskey, hundreds of gallons of “white mule”, and one of the largest stills ever discovered was found as part of a large operation and 34 bootleggers and moonshiners were arrested including a former justice of the peace. 

There will be a big demand for every available room and bed in town during the fair. If you have any accommodations suitable for guests, please let it be known.

A heavy cloudburst swept over Chugwater country reaching as far as Diamond and Slater Flats. The storm washed away the Chugwater lumber yard, scattering lumber for several miles all over the country. Cellars were filled with water and water stood 4 feet deep in some low hay meadows. Hail did considerable damage in Slater especially.

Fred Royal, the Chugwater man who suffered a very bad fracture of the back last week, was operated on at the Wheatland Hospital and doctors are quite hopeful that he may have pleasing results. One vertebrae was so badly crushed that it had to be removed to relieve pressure on the spinal cord. Soon after the operation Mr. Royal had no feeling in his legs, but now is experiencing some pain which is increasing, which doctors consider a good sign. If this operation is successful, the result realized will indeed be another remarkable triumph of modern surgery and of our local hospital and physicians.

The Wheatland ball team won against the Glendo team in the hardest fought game of the season. In the first 7 innings, neither side made a run, but in the eighth, Glendo scored two and in the ninth, Wheatland nosed out by putting three men across the plate. Next week they will play Sunrise.

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